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for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through e woods d you hearhe crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impact us into the fut
to live in the privatized environment and not care about the civic situation. that is truly damaging to the possibility of already beleaguered ideals. nothing is simple. i cover the former soviet union and russia. i could go on at great length about how boris yeltsin undermined democracy and became a hero democracy. lech walnsa in many ways was not the. working bloke many made him not to be. gorbachev was a visionary who came to power. he saw he needed to change the country. he used his powers to do that. he withdrew from afghanistan. he called for nuclear abolition. he worked with ronald reagan. he understood you need political solutions, not military solutions. when the soviet troops were ready to come out of the barracks so the berlin wall would not come down, he told them to stay in the barracks, the empire is going. we cannot be a country that will be one of glasnost and perestroika if we live the way we have. it is the 20th anniversary of the soviet union, the end of the soviet union. many people in russia blame him for the economic conditions in which they live. they blame him
monoxide there is the beginning consciousness about the environment, of a legacy of 100 years in the oil industry that has really damaged the environment. there's a lot to be done in terms of the country. but what was said previously, the venezuelan deficit is not out of line with the rest of latin america. public debt is less than the last fiscal that is less than 7.8% from a public that is about 45%, wait in line with latin america. latin america is more united than ever before. it 12 years ago you did not have the union of the line unions. you did not have latin americans resolving own internal affairs as was the case in bolivia and part of bolivia's right wing attempt to separate from bolivia and to the president of chile creating or calling for a meeting of presidents and making a declaration about the integrity of bolivia. i think it speaks to the fact latin america is confident in ways we have never seen before. i think venezuela has played in a court ruling that as an advocate to regional integration. >> michael shifter, what about these changes at the regional level of venezuela
care, but economics, education, climate change, the environment. i think you see a lot of different opinions and thoughts and ideas of how to get sun and how we find compromise in the united states senate. >> host: how did that play out in the number of leadership roles in congress? >> guest: is a great place to be. we have a new number and then in the senate serving as chairs of committees. in fact, senator barbara mikulski is the first woman to serve as the chair of the powerful appropriations committee and how that would change dynamics of the committee will see in the years to come. dianne feinstein in charge of intelligence. barbara boxer, more and more. patty murray goes through the list on budgets. and on the high side, we now have seven women ranking on major committees in the house. i should remind you that the house republicans a course in the majority have zero win in sharing any major committees. in fact, they are all white and cherry age or communities that have one women sharing a minor committee and that happens to be the administration committee. so we feel we are in
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
-tune plans and programs as we confront both the dynamic security environment in the nation's fiscal challenges as well. will it just in compromise is necessary, but we will be brought consensus that the congress on the way forward to avoid a hollow military. this must be our priority. nevertheless, despite enduring challenges, i'm please to note our air force had made progress in any areas and can point to a number of accomplishment during the past calendar year. we work through the act did reserve component for structure challenges that were part of the fy 13 president's budget proposal to produce a compromise which congress passed unfreezing previously approved for structure changes. we confronted the problem of assaults and unprofessional relationships that basic military training and have come the defenders. we're strengthening our prevention efforts in recent initiatives in this area include the air force might help them while for inspection the establishment of a special but this council program. with regard to space launch, the air force completed nine successful national sec
up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. haour first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have to be thinking, how much more reve
campaigning for the environment. he says becoming a grandparent just makes that more important. he also says he worries every night because his sons don't just honor the military, they serve in it. in a rare interview, prince charles says he feels he will have to answer to his royal grandchild on the state of the environment. >> you are soon to be a grandfather for the first time, so many congratulations. >> i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild, why didn't you do something? it makes it even more obvious to try to make sure that we leave them something that isn't a total -- >> reporter: environmental causes, something he shared with his children, growing organic vegetables on his farm and recently had an endangered frog named after him. >> we present you with a frog. >> reporter: but prince charles heir to the throne is also a military parent. immediate worry is prince harry serving as an apache helicopter pilot in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away
a clunker for the environment. they say the program produced tons of unnecessary waste while doing little to curb greenhouse gas emissions. the emphasis was on car shredding and not recycling even though they say cars are almost completely recyclable. if they had recycled just metal and plastic it would have saved 24 million barrels of oil. department of transportation deemed cash for clung ears success. >> welfare recipients are taking out cash at new york strip clubs liquor stores and x-rated shops and presumably spending it there. they looked at 200 million or ebt records. the food stamp programs bans purchase of booze and lottery tickets with ebt card but cash assistance and is intended to spent on housing and utilities and household necessities can be obtained at atms. a senior fellow says, quote. i don't blame riptsd, if you are poor, its crummy life and you wanted to have a drink or see a naked woman. i blame the people who are in charge of this. >> a massachusetts democratic governor is downplaying the news his state cannot locate 19,000 people who have either been receiving welfa
to take care of the environment. >> and our response to that s we have no problem with the protection of the environment and wettelands but if it is a public good the entire public should have to pay for it. you shouldn't force one property owner to bear the entire burden of playing for that. >> shannon: to get the permit that he wants to fix the land. do you you feel like you you have is taken on something that is a bigger fight for all americans, all landowners. >> definitely. this affects, of course, not only us and we are in the final stages but it affects any one in the state of florida who owns property. and as far as that goes in this country who owns property because if you assuming that we do come through this successfully it will at least hopefully stop this flood of government regulation and taking land. >> shannon: at this point do you feel like it is a fair fight, the individual land own oar versus the government? do you feel like there is a balance of powethere or not? >> if i had warren buffett's money it would be fair. there are two aspects. number one the financial an
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of what happened there in the eyes of, you know, the united states officials that pursued that war. so again, you could make the argument that in afghanistan something similar could happen. but there's no doubt a great deal of uncertainty, great deal of questions remain. as to whether or not the central government in afghanistan can actually control the military and preserve the security, integrity of that country. and that remains to be seen. >> if only we could predict the future. all right, ayman, good to see you. >> thanks a
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
itself in an environment of which the president's won re-election and they don't want him to do anything he wants. they're also very muched concerned generally about what hagel probably intends to do and that is to continue panetta's effort to streamline the pentagon and make budget cuts. those who are in favor of a strong defense are against that and therefore against hagel's perception more cuts are necessary and finally there is a great deal of concern about hagel's statement that unilateral american action in trying to restrict what iran can do economically and with its money, hagel doesn't think that's a good thing to do and lots of people on both sides of the aisle in the senate who disagree with hagel about that and hearing about that in the hearings. >> it's interesting, colonel, that, again, going back to his war record and when you look at our nation as the president pointed out, could have a leader as secretary of defense who has been in that situation. he knows what it is like to have young men and women in the mud and the ground and like to see people, you go in to war with
environment of the match such as that. >> i spoke with a man that a range of the match race who died a couple of years ago, and he said this was an event that every single person in america cared about, and it was in every single newspaper. i went through hundreds of papers and you can see it in virtually every single one, a big front-page stories people speculating and getting angry about it, the whole nation divided up. on race day we got 40,000 people and there was only seat for 16,000. 10,000 people were out of the gates hanging from trees and sitting on offenses in the room to see the race and all the people we spoke to that were there that day for all kids at the time said that was the greatest sporting event they ever saw curious connect you have seen probably every photo imaginable, but for those of you describe that photograph for me. what is this? >> that's the start. they had the starting date because the war admiral was a high strong horse at the gate and that is the top of the stretch. >> for those of you that are here we will pass this around. but take a look at the fence behind
year to year and the environment changes, the discussion goes further. i think there will be some developments over the next few years in regards to these two guys and sosa includedut is enou toump them up another 40% wii is what they need 0 get into the hall. >> i'm curious in the last 30-seconds, you said the writers look at other cry i can't, the brirs and the strikeouts and those are things like character. is that something well defined in baseball and in sports? >> well, you know, that rule was written a long time ago. so ty cobb who is a notorious womanizer is easily in the hall of fame. what defines character has evolved over time. this has defined the discussion another ars and hall of fame don't have that in their procedure. >> barry sverluga thank you very much. >> thank you for having me. >> ifill: again, the major developments of the day: a major new study found one in eight american teenagers has had suicidal thoughts and one of every 25 has attempted suicide. there was word that president obama will nominate his chief of staff, jack lew, to be treasury secretary. whi
. there are changes in votes year to year and the environment changes, the discussion goes further. i think there will be some developments over the next few years in regards to these two guys and sosa included but is it enough to bump them up another 40% wii is what they need 0 get into the hall. >> i'm curious in the last 30-seconds, you said the writers look at other cry i can't, the brirs and the strikeouts and those are things like character. is that something well defined in baseball and in sports? >> well, you know, that rule was written a long time ago. so ty cobb who is a notorious womanizer is easily in the hall of fame. what defines character has evolved over time. this has defined the discussion and other areas and hall of fame don't have that in their procedure. >> barry sverluga thank you very much. >> thank you for having me. >> ifill: again, the major developments of the day: a major new study found one in eight american teenagers has had suicidal thoughts and one of every 25 has attempted suicide. there was word that president obama will nominate his chief of staff, jack le
as to believe that we ever could have done anything close to a 10. given the domestic political environment, international situation, we are in, the weakness of our economy there is nothing of the seven or eight in the cards. it is worth looking at a 10 to realize why we are not in the best of all possible worlds. issue one is the big enchilada, in dealing with the long-term fiscal balance that we face in 8 sensible way. i would have given a 10 to what folks were talking about the new was unachievable, the grants bargain be -- the grand bargain taxes that would have stabilized the debt to gdp ratio. that would have been a package somewhere in the 2-$3 trillion range. the tiny between the election in the first to work out all those details. irrespective of that, we have two political party snarling at each other and not a whole lot in the way of negotiations. that was not in the cards. nine would have come from enacting some big pieces accompanied by a framework that would specify how the rest of the puzzle would be put together over the next six months. some incredible enforcement mechanism
and also the competitive environment. obviously a lot of phones coming out at ces and across the spectrum. but let's be clear. a lot of work hard for nokia. 0% gain is not necessarily the start of a turnaround per se at this company. >> and morgan stanley, if you're thinking about buy microsoft, windows 8 disappointing. i do like to -- a lot of people call in on mad money, they want to talk about low dollar stocks. clearwire. nokia. supervalu, all big wins. typically speculation -- speculation is really bad, we have to be involved with pfizer, you know, you should be in merck. the percentage wins here are staggering and a lot of people hit it big. by the way, sirius worked out, too. >> at the same time when you have a low priced stock like that, there is a great deal of risk and i know you point that out many times. i won't enmention many of these until they pierce that $3 level. >> but i was skeptical and this is one of those rare times where skepticism for supervalu, skepticism for clearwire because it was at a dollar not take long ago and it turns out they're a very valuable company. >
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
difficult to get a loan than five or seven years ago. everybody know that is the lending environment was too loose. anybody could walk in and you didn't have to prove income and you could probably get it with no down payment. that department make sense. huh no skin in the game and so many loans went bad. the pendulum has swung and the lenders are worried that if they make loans now that they have financial liability. the rule is the ability to repay. if the borrower does not demonstrate the ability o ability to repay, the loan goes bad and the lender can be charged. >> this protects the lender as well. >> exactly. if they use these new rules that everybody will, it will be designated a qualified borrower. qualified borrowers are like preapproved by fannie mae and we will take loan and if it goes bad, it's our fault, not yours. >> how does it affect the howing market? >> not good. a lot of the market depends on first time home buyers. these are people who most need help. they tend not to have much in the way of a down payment and tend not to have the best credit in the world. they are just ge
. defense attorneys for the boy claim he was raised in a violent environment and taught killing people was okay. child welfare authorities in fact, jenna, made more than 20 visits to the home checking on the boy. but the public defender representing him argued the youngster joined his fare, a regional leader of the national socialist movement, to nazi rallies and to the mexican border to learn how to keep mex ans out of the u.s. they say he had a violent streak. stabbing a teacher while in kindergarten with a pencil and the question in this case is did know what he was doing was wrong? his 11-year-old sister told her days ahead of time he planned to shoot his dad to avoid a breakup with their step mom. that is where the case today back in court. it is heard by a judge, not a jury. that judge will decide if there was premedcation and -- premeditation and whether or not his fathers beliefs and the boy's exposure to neo-nazi tactics led to the murder. if the judge rules he is guilty he could be held by juvenile authorities until he is 23. that is the latest, jenna. jenna: what a case. jam
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
.com last month and here is the representative cynthia chase collins, what we can do is make the environment here so welcoming, some may not come and some may leave. one way to pass measures that restrict freedom that they think they will find her. another is it to shine the bright light of publicity on who they are and why they are coming. and lay it on the specifics though? >> as a matter of fact there hasn't been much since this. she served two terms in the house in new hampshire, and this is a relatively obscure legislator who got off to a very progressive, left wing blog and made these comments. look, one of the things to realize is the state of new hampshire has 400 members of the house and they see it's the largest deliberative body and free tolls mileage to the state capital. it's truly a citizen's legislature. for the most part most of the representatives serve the people of the granite state very well. every once in a while, you get what you pay for. in this case, i think maybe the voters of new hampshire wan to take perhaps another look at representative chase's intolerance, which
environment. >> sergeant cindy west from the wing county sheriff's department joins me on the phone from seattle. so, sergeant, thank you for calling in. i understand that authorities initially have been using cell phone pings trying to locate him. are you getting any sign from him whatsoever? >> i'm sorry. i can barely hear you. i think we have a bad connection. >> sergeant, can you hear me now? >> oh, this is never fun on live tv. cindy west, let me try one more time. let me ask about this man. >> i can hear you now. >> you do hear me. here's what i was asking. i know that folks in the sheriff's department using pings from the cell phone, trying to get a location. are you getting anything from him right now? >> no, unfortunately the pings we were getting from the cell phone were probably prior to the jump. we believe he either turned the cell phone off prior to the jump or after the jump it was damaged. and in keep in mind it doesn't give you an exact gps location, it gives you a general triangulation. based on that, the flight pattern of the helicopter, we narrowed it down to the area
a wonderful environment. a friend and i kind of had a romantic idea about starting a used bookstore. we both had english degrees and used to go around to different bookstores and thought it would be neat to open one. and we did and quickly found that we didn't know anything about business or the book business. and he dropped out and pursued other quests, and i kind of stuck with it. at that time there was a magazine called the antiquarian bookmen's weekly, and people -- the first 25 or 30 pages were articles about the book trade, and the rest of the magazine were lists of books for sale, and in the back of the magazine books that people wanted. so that was pretty much how i learned about the book business, going through that magazine every week and quoting books to other dealers and reading the articles. we started in '81 in the basement of a building up the street and, hence, that was the name, cellar stories, because we began in the basement of -- while we have a little bit of everything, we also have in-depth collections of rhode island history, we have a lot of math books, we have art an
only voted for obama. that kind of sets up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. our first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have t
something like libya, chaos, bad acting, all things of -- all kinds of things can happen in that environment. host: early in this conflict, you and others wrote about the family dynamics in the the assad family. his mother is still alive, and by many accounts, calling the shots behind the scenes. can you elaborate? guest: i have not heard that. it is a family affair. his father ruled syria for many years pdt killed 30,000 syrians in putting in -- for many years. he killed 30,000 syrians. the security forces have held tight around him. his mother calling the shots -- i'm not aware of that. host: one of our viewers saying i would prefer the position of switzerland. no one seems interested in blowing up their cities. a position that continues to percolate -- a position that continues to percolate in this country. est: people who read -- our leaders read it such. they go into a full retrenchment, retreat view. world is a very chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a
of a stable political system, by improved institutional environment, land rights, rule of law, judicial reform. none of this changes are going to happen overnight. and it's very hard for people in mr. mudd answer to elected officials or have to answer to boards of directors who are saying, show me the results. it's very hard for us to come to terms with the fact that the engagement of habitat for humanity for 27 years in haiti may actually be a really brief moment of time, not a long moment of time. but we need to begin to highlight the time of dimension what is happening. and that links to another theme which came through, throughout the proceedings today. we need to try to develop appropriate untenable standards of success. are the 10,000 homes and 55,000, people housed in a project that eric talked about, is that an accomplishment? yes, it is an encouragement but it's not necessarily, it doesn't seem like anacondas but if you talk about 2 million displaced people. like time when we think about what we mean by success, we have to operate at several different levels, and we can't find ourselv
would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we live in today. i think something else is important here and certai
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)